Portfolio

Update as of 15th of January 2017. The change column is calculated based on the purchase value of the stock.

The stock market pick-up speed in the last weeks, so the global values of our portfolio is improving, but we are still in red numbers. Hopefully the stock market continue to goes-up.

Shares Units Chg. %
Cash in CHF 4200
CS Group N (CSGN.VX) 4’600 -45.00
Lafarge-Holcim (LHN.VX) 1’600 -6.00
UBS Group N (UBSG.VX) 10’100 -14.30
Roche (ROGN.VX)  162  -7.32
Tax Advantage – 3rd Pillar
UBS Vitainvest 75 World 45.7 +5.06

I am planning to buy more stock end of February, when my 2016 bonus will be paid.

Cheers.

16 thoughts on “Portfolio

  1. You seem to have a pretty concentrated portfolio. Do you plan on adding other names to diversify a bit? I’m familiar with some of the names above but not all. That’s just one of the reasons I love to read blogs from outside the U.S. You can learn about many new companies you never heard of.

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    • DivHut,

      The portfolio is at the moment fairly concentrated, but I have put some cash on the side to benefit from the market fall, as we will probably see in the days coming.

      I mentioned that one of my next buy would be Adecco (Swiss multinational human resource consulting company), which I bought today. I will update the portfolio soon.

      You probably know the 2 banks (UBS and Credit Suisse) that own. These 2 positions are from long time ago which I am averaging down to benefit from the future dividend as well the potential up-side.

      ABB is operating mainly in robotics and the power and automation technology areas as well future up-side.

      Roche is Swiss global health-care company that operates worldwide under two divisions: Pharmaceuticals and Diagnostics.

      Transocean is one of the world’s largest offshore drilling contractors. I am suffering a lot on this position because of the price of the oil, but Today I bought again to average down.

      In way the portfolio is focused on Swiss companies, I prefer to avoid FX risks and I feel more confident with our great companies.

      Thanks for passing by and will spend some time looking at you blog as well.

      Cheers

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      • Hi retiredat50,

        Thanks for the complete explanations!

        I would honestly be afraid to have almost all my eggs in the same basket.
        On my side, I preferred a diversified portfolio and as I’m a lazy guy, I focused on ETFs. I hedged them against FX effects due to my short term goal of buying our home. As soon as this first goal will be reached, I will remove the hedge as it’s not effective on the long run.

        One question: what’s this “tax advantage account” you talk about? Third pillar?

        Thanks in advance for your answer.
        MP

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      • Hi MP,

        Yes the tax account I mentioned is the 3 ¨A¨ pillar. If you are an employee you can put a maximum of around 6768 (increasing a little bit every year). This amount if fully deductible from your tax (income).
        You can choose to put your money under a simple account that will give you around 1%-2% per year or you can choose in invest in fund with different risk level (% of equities).

        Check it out at UBS.ch for example.

        Cheers

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  2. By the way, with all your cash aside, you should think about investing in French real estate – looking at the latest SNB news 😉

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  3. Hi there Retireat50,

    I envy the slim portfolio that you have, I am trying to cut down my 48 stocks to a more sensible number, but I am also a big fan of diversification so the task will probably be quite hard… I was considering Credit Suisse for my PF, but that would mean adding another currency (I already have 2 plus Euro) and that’s getting a bit out of hand I am afraid… So I decided to take a similar German stock instead (MUV2).
    Will keep following your endeavours!

    Ciao ciao

    Stalflare

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    • Hi Stalfare,
      Thank you for kind words, as everybody knows diversification is important in order to minimize risk on the portfolio, but I know I would not be able to manage a portfolio as diversified as yours, which includes exchange risk. This why we stick to the Swiss Market, which no necessary the most active but give us some security.

      Thanks for passing by and good weekend.

      Cheers
      RA50

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  4. Another great blog, after the just discovered nomorewaffles, compliments. I checked your portfolio, have you never considered italian stocks? Cheers

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    • Hi Andrea,

      Thanks for te compliment! At the moment, our strategy is to stay with the Swiss Market to avoid the effect of exchange rate.
      Thanks for passing an have a great weekend,
      RA50

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  5. Thanks retired@50 for sharing your portfolio. It is very helpful to know how others approach investing in Switzerland, especially those in a similar age bracket and two income and no children situation. Do you use UBS to buy your shares? Or another brokerage? I am trying to decide which brokerage to use. I am also a bit confused about how one pays the stamp duty costs despite a lot of reading of different brokerage websites. Any clarification you could offer would be helpful. Many thanks and best of luck!

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    • Hi Jill,

      Thanks for passing by and dropping a message.
      Yes, I use UBS to buy/sell shares, the main reasons are that it’s all integrated with our UBS account, therefore very easy to transfer money from one account to another one and the UBS quotes is very nice. On top, I request a financial report at the end of the year to prepare out tax declaration, so it becomes very easy to manage the different gain/loss.
      The stamp duty, is directly paid when you buy/sell the share with UBS. So I have no issue with that.

      Hope I answered your questions?

      Cheers, RA50

      P.S. thanks for the luck, we all need it…

      Like

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